About Nick Earls

Nick Earls writes long, short and medium-sized fiction, so far tallying 26 books for adults, teenagers and children.

Reputable reviewers have compared his work with that of Nick Hornby, Raymond Carver, Martin Amis, VS Naipaul, JD Salinger, Woody Allen, David Mitchell and Jeffrey Eugenides, which just goes to show that, if you write enough and publish enough, anything can come your way.

He is the winner of a number of awards, including a Betty Trask Award (UK) and Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Award. Perfect Skin was the only novel to be a finalist in the Australian Comedy Awards in 2003, and was adapted into a feature film in Italy (Solo un Padre, Warner Brothers/Cattleya). 48 Shades of Brown was a Kirkus Reviews (US) book of the year selection, and was adapted into a feature film in Australia (Buena Vista/Prima). Five of his novels have been adapted into stage plays.

He has also written for newspapers, including the New York Times, the Australian and the Sydney Morning Herald.

His novels have appeared on bestseller lists in Australia, the UK and the Amazon Kindle Store.

His most recent work for adults, the novella series Wisdom Tree, was published worldwide, one novella per month, from May to September 2016.

He was born in Northern Ireland, but has spent most of his life in Australia. In 2012, the Age included him among its top ten Greatest Living Australians (along with Bob Hawke, Warwick Capper and Shane Warne …). He placed 12th in a 2013 poll of Australia’s all-time favourite novelists.

Novels, Novellas and Short Fiction Collections (English language)
Passion
After January (aka After Summer)
Zigzag Street
Bachelor Kisses
Headgames
48 Shades of Brown
Perfect Skin
World of Chickens (aka Two To Go)
Making Laws For Clouds
The Thompson Gunner (aka Tumble Turns)
Monica Bloom
Joel and Cat Set the Story Straight (co-written with Rebecca Sparrow)
The True Story of Butterfish
The Fix
Welcome to Normal
Analogue Men
Wisdom Tree
– Gotham
– Venice
– Vancouver
– Juneau
– NoHo

For Children (primarily – adults welcome too)
Word Hunters
– The Curious Dictionary
– The Lost Hunter
– War of the Word Hunters
– Top Secret Files
New Boy

Cashed-up multi-millionaire or Hollywood studio (or struggling film-maker) with a burning desire to turn a Nick Earls story into a film? Conference organiser with a posse of urban tunnellers, artisan cheese-makers or endangered venture capitalists to entertain between mains and desserts, and think Nick Earls might fit the bill? School interested in booking the live version of Word Hunters, or anything else related to Nick Earls’s books for school-age people? (Happy to talk novellas, stage and screen adaptations and my YA novels with teenagers, and to do the occasional workshop …) Please contact Caitlan Cooper-Trent at Curtis Brown in Sydney.

Author interested in being mentored through a book-sized project? Nick Earls is part of the Australian Writers Mentoring Program.

Think Nick Earls owes you money? Want to lavish him with praise? See sidebar for ways to contact him via Twitter and Facebook.

33 Responses to About Nick Earls

  1. Nick can you please contact me at the below email address. Many thanks.
    Susan Johnson

  2. Sean O'Boyle says:

    Hi Nick – greetings from NYC. Can you please drop me a line to my email – I have an idea…many thanks

  3. Caitlin Prescott says:

    Dear Mr Earls,
    The National Library aims to build a comprehensive collection of Australian on-line publications by identifying and archiving online publications that meet our collecting scope and priorities. Information about PANDORA, Australia’s web archive and access to archived titles can be found on the Library’s web site.
    If you could provide an e-mail address to discuss archiving your website that would be greatly appreciated.

  4. simon says:

    Hello Nick, I thought you may be interested in this information about a melatonin related anti-depressant agomelatine that is new to the market in Australia:
    http://www.australianprescriber.com/magazine/33/5/160/3/
    Turns out Jon Marshall was on the right track! fame and fortune could have been his!

    • nickearls says:

      It’s never easy being a couple of decades ahead of your time. At least a few of us know he’s due a share of the credit.

  5. heatherwringe says:

    Dear Nick Earls,
    “…does he need it to beep as it backs out?” is the funniest thing I have ever read. LOL indeed.
    That is all.
    Heather

  6. ✎ alev. says:

    Hi Nick!
    I’m not sure if you’d remember me, but I attended a writing sort of seminar on the Gold Coast, with a couple of other authors, I was the only child/teen there and after I bought one of your books, “After January” I was wondering how you were going with your writing since then? 🙂

    • nickearls says:

      Hi there. A few days at the Gold Coast and away from my novel was good for me – the sense of perspective helped me realise where I’d drifted off track. I came back, found the voice I think I need and I’ve been working hard at it since then. >30,000 words in a month. Which is good, but I need another month like it again right now … I hope all’s been going well with you.

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  8. Duncan says:

    Hello Nick Earls
    On the 26/08/13 I went to the Melbourne writers festival with my school and I heard you talking. I then went to my school library and borrowed the first word hunters book and I couldn’t put it down. They are really good books. Right now I am almost finished the second book. I was wondering if you are going to write more books or if its just a trilogy. You’re a great author. Please reply to my email.
    From Duncan

    • nickearls says:

      Hello Duncan.
      Sorry to take weeks to get back to you (I don’t think I’ve replied? have I?). Straight after the festival I left the country to hike on glaciers and do other things not ideally suited to being online. But I’m back now, and it was great to see this message from you. It’s really good to hear that about the books.
      We wanted to finish book 3 with a bang and make it a satisfying conclusion, but without closing off the possibility of writing more – maybe another trilogy. I’ve found plenty of other words with great stories behind them, or that would take Lexi and Al to really interesting places and times. Now all I need to do is find 3 years in my diary to do the writing …
      In the meantime, we’re looking at doing a spin-off book related to the first three, but with a different format.
      The most important thing about writing new Word Hunters books is knowing there might be some people wanting to read them, so your message is a good start.
      Thanks again.
      Nick

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  10. Jane Farmer says:

    Hi Nick,
    I rcently attended your “Characters” workshop in Adelaide. I’ve only been seriously writing for about 4 months with the Ayr “Pen Pushers” QLD. I was totally blowen away with what we did that night. Learnt so much. Great to do some workshops at this early stage, saves bumbling around and can get a bit more focused. Will take your ideas back to the group so we can all grow.
    Cheers
    Jane Ayr QLD

    • nickearls says:

      Thanks Jane.

      I’m very glad to hear it was useful. It was good to meet you there.

      I hope the rest of your SA visit goes well.

      Nick

  11. Tony says:

    Hey Nick,

    I’m trying to track down the name of a song that you sang/spoke on several years ago. You know the one with the “the paper clips are starting to matter” line….
    Also with whom did you collaborate with on the record ……..
    I haven’t heard it for years and it seems to have dropped out of the public consciousness ….or at least Google’s radar.
    It was good record ……I’m surprised that you didn’t go on to and become a famous recording artist 😉

    • nickearls says:

      Hey there,

      You have an impressive memory. The line comes from ‘Stationery’, from the album ‘Ten Things You Should Know About Sex’, which might have been credited to me and Iczer One, with Iczer One (after that known as I/O) being one of the projects of Brisbane sound guru Lawrence English. There were remixes on there by a number of people, including two of the Resin Dogs. One of the oddest moments of my career was when the clock radio, set to Triple J, woke me one morning with the sound of my own voice, and that song.

      Despite sporadic national airplay and a barnstorming set at the ’99 Livid Festival, the CD tallied around 300 sales, and world domination wasn’t to be.

      Nick

  12. Lorraine Lane says:

    Hello Nick,
    Found your first Word Hunter book in Mount Isa City Library (excellent source/resource for a bookworm), couldn’t put it down; nagged (requested) them to get me the second one, and hung out on a leafless branch for the third (oh, no, that can’t be all in the series), found it in a totally unconnected catalogue. Now own a physical copy of all three. Will there be more? Please. What part does Terry play in the scheme of things? Thank him, too, please.

    I have always loved words and how people like you put them together, and plus: you sent Lexi and Al on marvellous journeys to find origins of words. With the economy of the number of words in each book, you should be set to write – if necessary with different characters/scenarios (is this the plural of scenario?) as the protagonists, for the next hundred years or so. Mind you, you would be able to keep using Lexi and Al, they are young, and their dad and grandad are still involved (as I am) all their lives.

    I am waiting (not with bated breath, as it’s a long process) for grandchildren, nieces and nephews to show signs of having enquiring minds and a love of books and adventure, so that I can introduce them to your Word Hunters and, perhaps, entymology. Some are getting there – one lot is showing signs of interest in science/green science, others are into the Wishing Chair and the Faraway Tree adventures of Enid Blyton and the Silver Brumby series, so they are getting there – the others are too young yet, but it only takes time.

    What I need, for me and for them, are Word Hunter badges (not-too-expensive, but long-lasting), so that others can readily identify them amongst the millions of unaware, disinterested persons who have yet to be turned onto your books and perhaps, through them, to entymology – there’s obviously lots of work still to be done. It should be a nicer word than ‘work’ – I don’t have very fond memories of work; though many of my words came from there, it kept me from reading much, much more (and I enjoy reading upwards of three-to-four hundred books a year), despite having to shop, stow the shopping, get it out again, cook and eat it, then clean up, clean the house, keep in contact with family and friends and loving my man (this is a want-to-do and a pleasure) – left to myself, I would be eating raw vegetables, pouring in water and the occasional cappuccino/green tea/mint tea/etc., and ensconced in various comfortable places, reading, reading, reading. I subscribe to the ‘Dust if you must’ school of thought, favourite quote, from Quentin Crisp “If you don’t dust for seven years, it doesn’t get any thicker”. Can’t leave it quite that long in Mount Isa – lead in the ground means lead in the air, and other nasty chemicals, too.

    Didn’t think I’d rattle on this long, Best be off and doing, so that, necessaries having been done, I can get back to reading.

    Please answer me about Word Hunters badges soon. I hope you are not presently away on glaciers, or up mountains away from your emails – though I understand why it is important to do this sometimes. Could there possibly be a Word Hunter key for ordinary mortals to buy, too?

    Regards,
    Lorraine Lane

    (Family names Boag (Roman ‘boga’ – bridge); Howes (?), Hallam (‘Hall’- ‘kind’ and ‘forgiving’, perhaps servant/chamberlain)’, Lucas (?), Lane (seems obvious, but is it?)

    • nickearls says:

      Hello Lorraine – it was great to see your post. I’ve emailed you on the address attached to your post. If that address is no longer active, please let me know another.

  13. Ellie says:

    Hello C: I’m doing a World Author’s Project and for my author I chose you. Unfortunately I can’t find as much information on you as I need. I was wondering if you could contact me by email. This project requires personal achievements and about your life growing up and your family, current and old. If I can’t get this information that is okay but it will kill my english grade.
    Have a nice day 🙂

    • nickearls says:

      Hi Ellie, Maybe you didn’t get my email? Anyway, if not, please go ahead and send some questions to me at nickearls at optusnet dot com dot au

  14. Alan McGirvan says:

    Nick got some Collatral from 4IP W#e obviously had an impact on that 20 year ol in1980…….=-+ a Best Of my Gotcha calls Alan McGirvan Love the book.

    • nickearls says:

      As someone who’s spent some time inventing a 4IP legend over the past couple of years, it’s great to hear this from the genuine article. Quite a few people have been reminiscing with me about your 4IP days since the book came out.

  15. Thank you so much for Jessie’s signed book received today! If I wasn’t very happily married and safely (for you) far away in Perth, I would be there grabbing both cheeks and saying ‘I love you’! 🙂

  16. Hi Nick, where can I send a copy of my book ‘How Shrinks Think’ coz you helped inspire me to be a doctor writer, TY Helen
    PS Analogue men is a page turner & laughed at Ripper 76 description

    • nickearls says:

      It’s very good to hear all of that – thanks Helen. It’d be great to have a copy of the book. The best address is PO Box 461, Toowong, Qld 4066. Thank you.

  17. Barbara Johnson says:

    Hi Nick,
    I’m glad you liked the post on our school Blog about your book “New boy”. Our Year 5 students are reading this as a serial novel. Many of the students at our school in Roxburgh Park are refugees, thus can relate to your main character. They are loving the book and I have just bought more copies, as there is a long waiting list to read it. Do you do school visits? Is there any chance you could pay a visit to our school?? The students would love to meet you. Regards Barbara Johnson

    • nickearls says:

      Hi Barbara,

      Thanks very much for your message.

      I really appreciate what you’re doing with New Boy with your students, and it’s very rewarding to hear it’s made a connection with some who have come here in challenging circumstances. It means a lot to hear that.

      I’m based in Brisbane and don’t have any Melbourne trips in my diary at the moment, but if that changes I’d certainly be keen to come to your school and meet your students.

      In the meantime, thanks again for getting in contact. I tried replying to the email address that came with your message, but my email bounced back. In case it’s useful, my email address is nickearlsauthor at gmail dot com.

      Nick

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  19. Sally says:

    Nick,
    I just finished your book AFTER SUMMER. At first I thought where is this guy going-what is this? But it didn’t take me long at all to fall in love with the story and characters. It’s quirky and fun and reminds me of my own youthful summers.
    From U.S. – Texas

    • nickearls says:

      Thank you. It’s great to hear that a book closing in on its 20th birthday can still work for a new reader. I really appreciate you letting me know.

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